Hebrews 9


































The Adventist sanctuary doctrine teaches that the cleansing of the sanctuary in heaven started in 1844. 

In 1844, at the end of the prophetic period of 2300 days, He entered the second and last phase of His atoning ministry. It is a work of investigative judgment which is part of the ultimate disposition of all sin, typified by the cleansing of the ancient Hebrew sanctuary on the Day of Atonement. In that typical service the sanctuary was cleansed with the blood of animal sacrifices, but the heavenly things are purified with the perfect sacrifice of the blood of Jesus. (Adventist Fundamental Belief #24)

The New Testament has one passage that overtly discusses the cleansing of the heavenly sanctuary—Hebrews 9. Far from showing that the cleansing of the sanctuary would happen in 1844, it demonstrates that this cleansing took place in the first century.  

In Hebrews 9:23 we see a plain reference to the cleansing of the heavenly sanctuary:

Heb 9:23  Thus it was necessary for the copies of the heavenly things to be purified with these rites, but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these.

This verse asserts that cleansing of the heavenly things is necessary. Some translations of the verse, such as the English Standard Version above, give a past-tense timing to this verse, but verse 23 has no timing of its own. It merely states the necessity of cleansing based on the earthly type.

Richard Davidson, Adventist scholar and chair of the Old Testament Department, Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, spells out the lack of specified timing in 9:23:

Note that in Heb 9:23, the word anagkē "necessity" is a noun, and katharizesthai "to be cleansed" is an infinitive. Neither of these terms give an indication of time--past, present, or future. 
(“Christ's Entry 'Within the Veil' in Hebrews 6:19-20: The Old Testament Backround” Andrews University Seminary Studies, Autumn 2001, 186)

Because of the fact that the verse itself has no timing, some Adventists have suggested that the author is merely hinting at a future Day of Atonement cleansing without spelling out any details. This future cleansing Adventists have often applied to 1844 as the beginning of the Day of Atonement cleansing of the sanctuary.  

While the verse itself has no timing, it is directly linked to verses, logically and grammatically, that do have a stated timing. Those verses we can place squarely in the past from the perspective of the author of Hebrews.

In examining the argument of the author in this section, we need to pay careful attention to the connecting words used. They indicate the relation of one section to the next. We see, for instance, that in Hebrews 9:23 the verse is tied to the preceding verse by the term translated in English thus. The word in Greek is ouv.

Heb 9:23 Thus it was necessary for the copies of the heavenly things to be purified with these rites, but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these.

Heb 9:23 ᾿Ανάγκη οὖν τὰ μὲν ὑποδείγματα τῶν ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς τούτοις καθαρίζεσθαι, αὐτὰ δὲ τὰ ἐπουράνια κρείττοσι θυσίαις παρὰ ταύτας.

This term shows that the statement of the necessity of the cleansing of the heavenly things in verse 23 flows from the thought of verse 22. What was the argument of verse 22?

Heb 9:22  Indeed, under the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins.

Verse 22 is the culmination of the argument of chapter 9 to this point. It states a principle which links all the various cleansing rites with blood. Blood was necessary for forgiveness, and everything is purified with blood.

In the Daniel and Revelation Committee Series volume on Hebrews, Adventist scholar William Johnsson describes the importance of verse 22 in this way:

Many exegetes of Hebrews have seen in this verse the so-called "blood rule," a critical plank in the author's argument. It clearly looks far wider than inauguration, since it is dealing with aphesis, ("release," "pardon"). Verse 22, in fact, is summing up the role of blood in the OT. It is reaching back beyond verse 18 to embrace verses 1-21. ("Defilement/Purification and Hebrews 9:23," 96)

It is with this in mind that verse 23 says that the cleansing of the sanctuary is thus necessary. The cleansing of verse 23 is a cleansing to deal with sin and to provide for forgiveness.

Verse 23 is related not only to the discussion before it but also to the arguments after it. Again we see another important connecting word showing that the fulfillment of the cleansing is now being spoken of:

Heb 9:23 Thus it was necessary for the copies of the heavenly things to be purified with these rites, but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these.
Heb 9:24 For Christ has entered, not into holy places made with hands, which are copies of the true things, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God on our behalf.

The word rendered for here in verse 24 is γαρ and connects verse 23 to the argument of 24-25, which deals with Christ's entry into God's presence. It is a term used when drawing a conclusion from a preceding argument. Therefore, the necessity of the cleansing of the heavenly things is directly tied to, and explained through, the statements in verse 24. Verse 24 shows Jesus' past-tense entry directly into God's presence.

Verse 24 spells out a couple of things about Jesus' entry:

1. Christ has entered not into the holy places made with hands. (The earthly tabernacle).

2.  Christ has entered into the true--heaven itself--to appear in God's presence in our behalf.

Verse 25 continues speaking about this entry, which is part of the argument for the cleansing of the heavenly things.

Again we see an important connecting word, ουδε, which has the idea nor, or, nor yet.

Heb 9:25  Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own

Heb 9:25  οὐδ᾿ ἵνα  πολλάκις προσφέρῃ ἑαυτόν, ὥσπερ ὁ ἀρχιερεὺς εἰσέρχεται εἰς τὰ ἅγια κατ᾿ ἐνιαυτὸν ἐν αἵματι ἀλλοτρίῳ

Verse 24 started with a negative statement: Christ entered not. . . .

Verse 25 continues with another negative statement regarding Christ's entry:
Nor yet . . . 

In verse 25 we have not only the connecting word ουδε but also a clause that indicates purpose. It uses the word ινα, which means in order that.  So we can translate the first part of verse 25 something like this:

Nor yet was it in order that. . . .

Nor yet refers to the entry into God's presence spoken of in verse 24. Jesus did not enter in the the earthly sanctuary made with hands. Nor yet did He enter in order that He might offer Himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own.

The words for nor yet and in order that, which begin the verse, can refer only back to the event of entry and presentation in God's presence of verse 24. So we see that verse 25 still describes aspects of Jesus' entry.

The following Bible versions recognize this connection to the entry in verse v. 24 and add the word enter to vs. 25 to clarify that it has reference to the entry of Christ in verse 24:

Nor did he enter heaven to offer himself again and again, the way the high priest enters the Most Holy Place every year with blood that is not his own. (New International Version)

Nor did He [enter into the heavenly sanctuary to] offer Himself regularly again and again, as the high priest enters the [Holy of] Holies every year with blood not his own.
(Amplified Bible)

And he did not enter heaven to offer himself again and again, like the high priest here on earth who enters the Most Holy Place year after year with the blood of an animal.
(New Living Translation)

The following commentaries, which look particularly at the Greek text, recognize the significance of this combination of ουδε and ινα:

The New International Greek Testament Commentary recognizes that the author's phrase nor yet in order that is tied to the main clause in verse 24, for He has not entered:

The author writes ουδ ινα rather than ουχ ινα because the main clause (ου γαρ...εισηλθεν) is expressed negatively.

The Interpretation: The Epistle to the Hebrews

ου and now ουδε: Christ did "not...nor," etc. Christ did not enter into a mere earthly sanctuary; nor (did he enter heaven) in order to be offering himself often like as the high priest enters into the sanctuary year by year

Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews, by Franz Delitsch 

V. 25 Nor yet (is he entered in) that he should offer himself often, as the high priest entereth into the holy of holies year by year with alien blood.

Expositor’s Bible Commentary 

“Nor” carries on the negative at the beginning of v.24: Christ did not enter a man-made sanctuary…nor did he…offer himself again and again.” Where there is nothing in the Greek corresponding to NIV’s “did he enter heaven,” the words seem required.

The Expositor’s Greek Testament

“Nor yet [did he enter in] in order to offer Himself repeatedly,” that is, He did not enter in for a brief stay from which He was to return to renew His sacrifice.

Vincet's Word Studies 

Nor yet that (οὐ δ' ἵνα)
Supply did he enter. “Nor yet did he enter that he might offer,” etc.

The entry then of verse 24 is still being spoken of in verse 25, and the argument, in regard to the necessity of the cleansing of the heavenly things, is still being explained.

From examining the argument of the author in vss. 23-25 we realize that the statement in verse 23, regarding the necessity of the cleansing of the heavenly things, is not just an isolated, timeless, statement that is mentioned but not elaborated upon. Rather, verse 23 introduces the author’s description of the fulfillment of the cleansing of the heavenly sanctuary. This fulfillment involves Jesus’ entry into God’s presence, on our behalf. This entry is compared to the yearly entry of the high priest, every year, with blood not his own. This description is a clear reference to the Day of Atonement entry of the high priest to cleanse the earthly sanctuary.

Even Adventist scholars have recognized that verse 25 refers to the Day of Atonement service. Below are some quotations from Adventist sources that recognize day of atonement references in Hebrews, and especially Hebrews 9:25.

Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary on Hebrews 10:1:

Compare ch. 9:25, 26, where the work of Christ is again contrasted with that of the earthly high priest on the Day of Atonement.

M.L. Andreasen in The Book of Hebrews:

On Hebrews 4:16

Verse 16. "The throne of grace." This expression in Christian terminology has always been closely connected with prayer, and hence with the mercy seat. It was at the mercy seat the high priest supplicated
God for forgiveness on the Day of Atonement. We are invited to come there to find grace to help in time of need. (64)

On Hebrews 9:25-26

Verses 25, 26. The priests entered the first apartment daily, the high priest once every year when he went into the most holy with the blood of the bullock and the goat. (127)

William Johnsson in his essay "Day of Atonement Allusions," which can be found in the DARCOM volume on Hebrews, lists 9:25 as clearly alluding to the Day of Atonement.

The context clearly points to a Day of Atonement allusion (high priest . . . yearly . . . blood [cf. 9:7]) (113)

Alwyn Salom in his appendix article in the Daniel and Revelation committee series, speaking of verse 24, 25:

The reference in the context of the Day of Atonement service of the earthly high priest is not to the outer compartment of the sanctuary. (227)

Richard Davidson, notes that vs. 25 is an unmistakable reference to the Day of Atonement:

I agree with Young that Hebrews 9:7 and 9:25 refer to Day of Atonement, because of the clear references to “once a year” and “every year” respectively. ("Inauguration or Day of Atonement?" Andrews University Seminary Studies, Spring 2002, 79)

Felix Cortez states in his article "From the Holy to the Most Holy Place: The Period of Hebrews 9:6-10 and the Day of Atonement as a Metaphor of Transition" in the Journal of Biblical Literature, 125.3, Fall 2006, 527 (footnote):

Unchallenged references to the Day of Atonement in the central section include 9:7, 25

Despite recognizing these allusions to the Day of Atonement, the above authors largely find ways to avoid the conclusion that Jesus completed the sacrifice, entry and purification that Hebrews speaks of in the past tense. Their means for doing so do not always agree. But they in general agree that Jesus did not complete that part of the service. Yet the very texts that they admit are Day of Atonement references are set in the past, and seen as fulfilled.


Vss. 24-25, describing Jesus’ entry into God’s presence, is clearly in the past tense, which indicates that the cleansing of the sanctuary happened prior to the writing of the book of Hebrews. To get around this implication, Adventist scholars say that verse 25 is referring not to the work of Christ at His entry into God’s presence but to Jesus’ death on earth. If Adventist scholars admit that Jesus’ past-tense activity in vss. 24-25  is the fulfillment of the entry and work of the high priest on the Day of Atonement, then their entire 1844 doctrine collapses. To admit such would be to admit that Jesus cleansed the heavenly sanctuary in the first century.

Notice how Richard Davidson attempts to deal with this problem of a clear Day of Atonement reference when discussing verse 25:

The contrast is drawn between Christ’s once-for-all sacrifice of himself and the high priest’s entering the sanctuary “often”--every year at the time of the Day of Atonement--“with the blood of another.”  
(“Christ's Entry 'Within the Veil' in Hebrews 6:19-20: The Old Testament Backround” Andrews University Seminary Studies, Autumn 2001, 187)

By making Jesus’ activity in verse 25 refer back to His death, rather than to His entry into heaven,  Davidson can avoid the implication that the Day of Atonement cleansing was fulfilled.

The key to determining whether verse 25 refers only to Jesus' death is the meaning of the phrase offer Himself.

Heb 9:25  Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own

Heb 9:25  οὐδ᾿ ἵνα  πολλάκις προσφέρῃ ἑαυτόν, ὥσπερ ὁ ἀρχιερεὺς εἰσέρχεται εἰς τὰ ἅγια κατ᾿ ἐνιαυτὸν ἐν αἵματι ἀλλοτρίῳ

Some interpreters, such as Davidson above, have understood the phrase offer Himself in verse 25 to refer to Jesus' death. It is true that the sacrificial death is often called an offering to God, and the term is used this way in Hebrews to speak of Jesus' death as an offering. 

However, in verse 25 Jesus' offering of Himself happens as part of His entrance into God's presence. The offering then is not speaking of the death but of the presentation before the Father. The death did not happen in the sanctuary as part of the entrance, but on the earth, on the cross. The word for offer here means present or offer or bring.

Verse 25 is speaking about Jesus' presentation of Himself in God's presence. In the earthly type of the Day of Atonement, as part of the cleansing of the heavenly things, the earthly high priest would kill the sacrificial animals. He would enter the sanctuary and go directly into God's presence. He would bring blood with him and would sprinkle the blood on the mercy seat of the ark.  We see this described in Hebrews 9:7:

Heb 9:6  These preparations having thus been made, the priests go regularly into the first section, performing their ritual duties,
Heb 9:7  but into the second only the high priest goes, and he but once a year, and not without taking blood, which he offers for himself and for the unintentional sins of the people.

What we see in Hebrews 9:24-25 is the fulfillment of this entry with blood into God's presence. Jesus' offering of Himself here is the author's way of of showing the presentation of the blood on the Day of Atonement.

The evidence for this view is described below:

Evidence 1:  The term that is used for offer in Hebrews 9:25 is the term that is used in 9:7 when describing the sprinkling of blood in the earthly Day of Atonement:

Heb 9:7 but into the second only the high priest goes, and he but once a year, and not without taking blood, which he offers for himself and for the unintentional sins of the people.

This was noted by Adventist scholar Felix Cortez in a footnote on page 25 of his recent dissertation The Anchor of the Soul that Enters 'Within the Veil':  The Ascension of the 'Son' in the Letter to the Hebrews:

Interestingly, Hebrews departs from the language of the LXX to describe the manipulation of blood by the High Priest on the Day of Atonement: the blood is not “sprinkled” on the sanctuary but “offered” (9:7).

The author in 9:7 uses an unusual term to describe the Day of Atonement ministration of blood in the earthly sanctuary. The blood in the Day of Atonement type was sprinkled. Instead of sprinkling, the author of Hebrews describes it as presentation of blood. This anticipates the fulfillment, in which Christ enters God's presence (9:24) and offers Himself (9:25), just as the earthly high priest offered the blood on the Day of Atonement in God's presence, according to the author in vs. 7.

Heb 9:7 but into the second only the high priest goes, and he but once a year, and not without taking blood, which he offers for himself and for the unintentional sins of the people.

Heb 9:24 For Christ has entered, not into holy places made with hands, which are copies of the true things, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God on our behalf.
Heb 9:25 Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own

Jesus did not sprinkle Himself in heaven, but He presented Himself. His shed blood had long since dried after the cross. But He rose again and presented His blood in the form of a living, completed sacrifice. He presents Himself in God's presence.

Evidence 2: Jesus' offering of Himself is compared to the entry of the earthly high priest, not the killing of the animal by the high priest.

Heb 9:25 Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own,

The blood is already shed and the priest is entering in verse 25.  This is not a reference to the death of the animal.

As we already saw, the phrase nor yet in order that indicates that verse 25 is about the entry into God's presence, continuing the thought of verse 24.  It makes no sense to say, Nor yet did He enter in order that He might offer Himself in death repeatedly. The death did not happen at the entry but on earth. The term offer here indicates the offering of Himself in God's presence. And that did happen at the time of the entry.

This offering in heaven fits the type under discussion, the cleansing of the heavenly things, which was accomplished by blood presentation in God's presence on the Day of Atonement.

Evidence 3:  If we take Jesus' offering of Himself in verse 25 to be death, then it does not make sense of the whole argument in verses 25 and 26.

Heb 9:25 Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own,
Heb 9:26 for then he would have had to suffer repeatedly since the foundation of the world. But as it is, he has appeared once for all at the end of the ages to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.

The argument the author is making in verse 26 is that if Jesus were to offer Himself in heaven before God often, He would also have to suffer (death) often. The ministration of the blood followed the death of the victim.

But this argument, that for Jesus to present Himself often in heaven would require Him to suffer often, is lost if both offer and suffer mean death. If both offer and suffer refer to death, then the argument of the two verses would be:

Nor yet was it to die often . . . for then he would have had to die often.

The statement would be redundant.

Instead, what we see in vs. 24 and 25, in direct answer to the necessity of the cleansing of the heavenly things, is an entrance into God's presence. There Jesus fulfilled the offering of the blood by the earthly high priest on the Day of Atonement. Jesus died once for all, entered once for all, and then presented Himself in God's presence not often but once for all. Jesus is living. He did not present His blood in a bowl but in His person.

So the argument of verse 23, that it is necessary for the heavenly things to be cleansed by better sacrifices, has now been spelled out. It is through Jesus' past-tense, once-for-all death, once-for-all entry, and offering of Himself in God's presence, not often, but once, that the heavenly things are cleansed. Jesus made purification for sins. He provided the corporate means of forgiveness. He fulfilled the Day of Atonement type of cleansing in the sanctuary.  And this all happened in the first century, past tense to the author of Hebrews.

Here are a number of commentaries which discuss this presentation of Jesus in God's presence:

Commentary on the New Testament by D. D. Whedon

This offer is parallel to the entereth of the high priest; it, therefore does not here mean to sacrifice himself, but to present himself in heaven, as the high priest presented himself in the holy place. Yet in both cases a previous sacrifice takes place.

The Expositor’s Greek Testament

“Nor yet [did he enter in] in order to offer Himself repeatedly,” that is, He did not enter in for a brief stay from which He was to return to renew His sacrifice. Westcott holds that the “offering” corresponds with the offering of the victim upon the altar, not with the bringing of the blood into the Holy of Holies. He refers to v. 14, εαυτον προσηνεγκεν, to ver. 28, and also to x. 10. Similarly Weiss and others. But in ix. 7 προσφερει distinctly refers to the bringing in and application of the blood in the Holy of Holies, and the context of the present passage seems decidedly to make for the same interpretation. The sequence of the ινα clause after εισηλθεν; the analogy presented in the clause under ωσπερ; and the consequences stated under επει (ver. 26) all combine in favouring this meaning. The high priest enters the Holiest annually, but Christ’s entering in was of another kind, not requiring repetition.

Vincet's Word Studies

Offer himself refers rather to Christ's entrance into the heavenly sanctuary and presentation of himself before God, than to his offering on the cross. . . .The sacrifice on the cross is described by παθειν suffer, Heb 9:26, and is introduced as a distinct thought. The point is that, being once in the heavenly sanctuary, Christ was not compelled to renew often his presentation of himself there, since, in that case, it would be necessary for him to suffer often. Each separate offering would necessitate a corresponding suffering.

New International Commentary on the New Testament 

Moreover, when Christ entered into the heavenly sanctuary, he entered once for all. His entrance into the presence of God on his people's behalf, by virtue of his own blood, is set in sharp contrast to the entrance of Israel's high priest into the material holy of holies on the Day of Atonement.

Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews by Franz Delitsch

V. 25 Nor yet (is he entered in) that he should offer himself often, as the high priest entereth into the holy of holies year by year with alien blood.

The comparison is between the offering of the Jewish high priest within the veil, and that of Christ in the eternal sanctuary: the προσφερειν εαυτον here spoken of cannot therefore be ...the self-sacrifice of Christ upon earth, but a self-presentation subsequent to that. The Jewish high priest goes year by year into the typical sanctuary, εν...αιματι αλλοτριω, i.e. to offer there the blood of a sacrifice which is not himself. Not so with Christ. He is gone into the heavenly sanctuary once for all, not to offer Himself first now, and then again some time hence, and again afterwards, and so on in perpetual succession.

On verse 26:

An of-repeated self-oblation (πολλακις προσφερειν εαυτον) would have been impossible without an oft-repeated suffering of death (πολλακισ παθειν).

The Epistle to the Hebrews: The First Apology for Christianity, An Exegetical Study, by Alexander Balmain Bruce

These verses (25-28) may be paraphrased thus: Christ has entered into the heavenly sanctuary to appear in the presence of God for us, and to abide there, herein differing from the Levitical high priest, who went into the most holy place and came out and went in again, repeating the process year by year, and making many appearances before God, with the blood of fresh sacrifices. Christ presents Himself before God once for all, remaining in the celestial sanctuary, and not going out and coming in again and again. It must be so; any other state of things would involve an absurdity. If Christ were to go in and come out, go in and come out, again and again, that would imply His dying over and over again; for the object of the repeated self-presentations in the presence of God on the part of the Jewish high priest was to offer the blood of new victims; but as Christ’s sacrifice was Himself, each new self-presentation would in His case imply a previous repetition of His passion. He must often on that supposition have suffered death since the foundation of the world.

The Greek Testament, on vs. 26, in reference to 25 and 26 and the argument therein:

This παθειν is here not equivalent to that προσφερειν, but is emphatically placed as a new necessity, involved in that; the πολλακις being common to both: the πολλακιςπροσφερειν necessitated the πολλακιςπαθειν. If Christ’s view in entering heaven was to offer, present, himself often to God, then, as a condition of that frequent presentation, there would be an antecedent necessity for Him to suffer often: because that self-presentation is in fact the bringing in before God of the Blood of that his suffering: and if the one was to be renewed, so must the other be likewise.

Jamieson Faussett Brown

Construe, "Nor yet did He enter for this purpose that He may offer Himself often," that is, "present Himself in the presence of God, as the high priest does (Paul uses the present tense, as the legal service was then existing), year by year, on the Day of Atonement, entering the Holy of Holies.

Beacon Bible Commentary

Extends the thought of the previous verse by affirming that this crucial self-presentation before the Father does not need to be repeated, as the high priest entereth into the [earthly] holy place every year with blood of others.

Jesus' purification/cleansing of sin at His ascension is made even more clear by another verse in Hebrews:

Heb 1:3 He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high

Jesus made purification for sins, then sat down. He made provision for all the world by His death, entry, and purification.

The Day of Atonement service in the sanctuary made blood cleansing for the sins of the people, which cleansed the heavenly things. Jesus is said to have already made this corporate purification for sins in the first century.

In the type, the priest in the sanctuary made atonement for the sins of the people, as these sins were what necessitated the cleansing of the sanctuary.  

Lev 16:16 Thus he shall make atonement for the Holy Place, because of the uncleannesses of the people of Israel and because of their transgressions, all their sins. And so he shall do for the tent of meeting, which dwells with them in the midst of their uncleannesses.
Lev 16:17 No one may be in the tent of meeting from the time he enters to make atonement in the Holy Place until he comes out and has made atonement for himself and for his house and for all the assembly of Israel.

Jesus made purification for sins in the first century and then sat at God's right hand. This is a straight-forward fulfilling of the type of the Day of Atonement cleansing that happened in the temple.

The type of cleansing portion of the Day of Atonement involved:

1. Death
2. Entry
3. Purification

Jesus did just that.

1. Once-for-all death:

Heb 10:11 And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins.
Heb 10:12 But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God,
Heb 10:13 waiting from that time until his enemies should be made a footstool for his feet.

2. Once-for-all entry:

Heb 9:12 he entered once for all into the holy places, not by means of the blood of goats and calves but by means of his own blood, thus securing an eternal redemption.

Heb 9:23 Thus it was necessary for the copies of the heavenly things to be purified with these rites, but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these.
Heb 9:24 For Christ has entered, not into holy places made with hands, which are copies of the true things, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God on our behalf.
Heb 9:25 Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own

3. Purification of sin:

Heb 1:3b After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high

Heb 9:23 Thus it was necessary for the copies of the heavenly things to be purified with these rites, but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these.
Heb 9:24 For Christ has entered, not into holy places made with hands, which are copies of the true things, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God on our behalf.
Heb 9:25 Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own

This is a fulfillment of what happened in the Day of Atonement cleansing in the earthly sanctuary. And the author, writing in the first century, describes it all as past tense, and therefore long before 1844.

We also see evidence of the fulfillment of the Day of Atonement entry and purification in the radical difference in access to God in the new covenant. The limited access to God in the old covenant is completely changed with Christ. In the earthly, only the high priest could come into God's presence, and then only once per year.

Jesus sets that on its head. Jesus went into God's presence and stayed. In fact, He sat down. The sitting of Christ is significant.

Heb 1:3b After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high,

Heb 10:11  And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins.
Heb 10:12  But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God,
Heb 10:13  waiting from that time until his enemies should be made a footstool for his feet.

The sitting of Christ at the right hand of God in Hebrews indicates His status as ruling with God. He is not just High Priest but He is also the Davidic King who is installed at God's right hand, ruling with Him.

More than that, Hebrews pictures Jesus sitting in contrast to the Old Testament system. The priest never sat down in the sanctuary because his work was not finished. He had to continually offer the same sacrifices, which never really removed sin.  Christ, on the other hand, completed the one sacrifice of Himself  and the one entry and then sat down, having made purification.

Notice how Hebrews contrasts the standing of the priest daily with Jesus' sitting down:

Heb 10:11  And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins.
Heb 10:12  But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God,
Heb 10:13  waiting from that time until his enemies should be made a footstool for his feet.

Moreover, Jesus' sitting down indicates that He was not withdrawing from God's presence as the earthly high priest had to do. Jesus entered God's presence and stayed.

And there, having completed the death, entry, and purification, He waits for His enemies to be made His footstool. He has completed the elements of the blood provision. 

Not only does Jesus sit at God's right hand, but now He has made it possible for us to go there too, right into God's presence. We can come boldly to Him to find help in time of need:

Heb 4:16 Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

Heb 10:19 Therefore, brothers, since we have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus,
Heb 10:20 by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain, that is, through his flesh,
Heb 10:21 and since we have a great priest over the house of God,
Heb 10:22 let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water.

All of us can come into God's presence, right to the throne, which could never happen in the old covenant. Truly Christ is better! Jesus now intercedes from the Father's right hand. We come to Him to receive in real time the benefits of His completed sacrifice and purification.  Jesus' role as High Priest is not over, but His provision is made. Now we either accept or reject the benefits that He offers through His one-time provision.

Where does this leave the Adventist sanctuary doctrine? Jesus already fulfilled the cleansing that Adventists apply to 1844. Jesus' death, entry, and purification already happened in the first century, past tense to the writing of Hebrews.

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